Medicare Part B: What does it Cover?

Medicare B covers the outpatient type of services needed to manage a person's health. This would include medical care needed to prevent illness, and to manage illness when the patient is not admitted to a medical facility, such as a hospital. Medicare part B covers things like doctors visits, Durable Medical Equipment (DME,) mental health…

Medicare Part A: What does it Cover?

Medicare Part A covers hospital type medical expenses. These expenses would include part or all of the costs of inpatient medical stay, supplies for treatment while admitted, skilled nursing facility admissions, hospice care, and even home health care services. Medicare part A is comprehensive, but it does not cover eyeglasses, routine dental care, or hearing…

How to Apply for Medicare?

You can apply for Medicare on the Medicare.gov website. This is normally part of the process when you apply for retirement or disability. By visiting medicare.gov, you can fill out a simple online form. You are given choices to apply for Medicare only, Return to a saved application, or to check your application status. The…

Medicare vs Medicaid: What is the Difference?

The Difference between Medicare and Medicaid is really about who is involved. Medicare is a Federally sponsored health plan while Medicaid is a Federal and State sponsored Health Plan. Medicare is available for qualifying people who are aged 65 or older or those people who have suffered a qualifying disability for more than 24 months.…

What if I have a Secondary Health Care Insurance?

The answer to that question depends on the rules of Coordination of Benefits. Sometimes Medicare will pay first, and your secondary insurance will pay second. Sometimes it is the other way around. What happens is that each type of insurance that you have is listed as a payer. Then each payer is assigned a number…

Employer Prescription Coverage: Does it work with Medicare?

Medicare requires that every Medicare beneficiary be enrolled in a qualifying Prescription Drug Program. Those would be: A qualifying Employer or Union Prescription Drug Program must be as comprehensive in coverage as Medicare part D. If your employer, past employer or Union offer a qualifying Prescription Drug Plan, then you do not have to enroll…

Medicare Effective Dates: How do they work?

There are two effective dates for the two types of qualified events. The first is the day you turn 65 years of age. This would be your effective date for Original Medicare part A and part B. The second effective date is for those who suffer from a qualifying disability. The effective date for your…